Furnace and the Fundamentals – Live in Cambridge Review Augst 23rd 2017

furnace

With a name like Furnace and the Fundamentals, it should be a cast-iron, nailed on the wall, skewered into the core of the Earth given that said band is as blood-boilingly elemental as they suggest. If only we had a pound for every time we were led along this merry path, only to be disappointed. Prepare yourselves – it actually happened. On an unassuming evening in Cambridge’s famed Portland Arms, the go-to venue for anyone who’s actually ANY GOOD, there was the quasi-religious spectacle of a band living up to their name. Bless everyone involved.

Party band? Weddings and bar mitzvahs? Soggy sausage rolls? None of it. Furnace and the Fundamentals is an almost perversely talented, energetic, musically-muscular volcano of a band which just happens to play cover versions. Forget your covers of Bon Jovi’s Total Eclipse of the Heart; forget even Bon Jovi’s own version of Total Eclipse of the Heart, and revel in the glory of 6 Australian-based go-getters in glittery red suits shaking you silly.

If you’re after a toilet break during the slow number, you’re in for a troublesome time (or at least the person stood next to you is). Furious from the off, Furnace and his cohorts don’t give you a second to collect your thoughts, powering through song after song without so much as a care for the audience’s collective cardio-vascular system. Half way through you realize you’re jigging along to songs you always thought you hated.

 

Never having thought myself how easy it would be to segue from KISS’s I Was Made For Lovin’ You to a wallpaper-peeling medley of Adele hits, Furnace make us all the eager students to their tartrazine-fuelled headmaster. Blurred Lines becomes Billie Jean; Ginuwine’s Pony becomes Bohemian Rhapsody. It seems obvious when Furnace and the Fundamentals rearrange what you ever thought of some of the most recognisable sounds from across the decades. We’d show you the setlist but with nods sometimes as brief as a couple of lines, we’d be here all day writing it down and our fingers simply wouldn’t stand it.

A packed crowd, who were clearly already savvy to the allure of the band, were joined by the performers on the floor as they did the conga through the crowd and keyboard master, Lachlan Nicholson, knocked out a killer keytar solo. Whilst drummer, Mike Solo, was confined to the corner of the stage, he still managed to add his two cents to the performance antics with stick spins, cross-handed drumming and some ingenious trills and transitions that hold the mash-ups together like superglue.

In some ways, it seemed like The Portland didn’t do justice to the quality musicianship and performance on show, with it struggling to keep a lid on the seemingly unlimited supplies of energy from every member of the band. These guys deserve to be playing bigger venues, packing out tour dates, day in, day out – because if everyone knew that cover bands could be like this, there wouldn’t be the stigma that is usually associated with them. Nonetheless, the lucky Cambridge crowd was treated to an intimate, no-holds-barred performance that proved that Furnace and the Fundamentals are the ultimate party starters – full stop.

It was all pretty revelatory stuff – the band come with a reputation for full-throttle, Olympic-standard party shows, complete with glitter cannons and can-can girls (possibly) but it still comes as quite a shock in the flesh. I really can’t recommend highly enough, one of the most (ahem) incendiary gigs in Cambridge this year. Toto? Check. The Darkness? Check. Beyonce? Check. Paul Simon? Check. How long have you got?

 

Australia Based Rhett May – The Violence Of Ice

Booze!? Rum!

Primarily influenced by the classic song writing of John Lennon, the Beatles and the Rolling Stones, Rhett May is a rock writer who has moulded his own sound over several decades in the industry. His self-produced rock is simple, raw and home-made – without over-the-top production but with plenty to say about May’s take on the modern world.

With a musical career which spans back to the seventies when his band Lucifer supported legendary rock band Queen, Rhett May is a voice of experience in a rock world which has become increasingly shallow. He’s toured the world, seen the music industry from the inside, and watched the dark side of the business consume those around him.

The-Violence-of-Ice

Links:

www.soundcloud.com/rhett-may-music

www.facebook.com/rhettmaymusic

www.twitter.com/rhettmay

www.rhettmay.com

www.reverbnation.com/rhettmay

https://itunes.apple.com/au/artist/rhett-may/id287901404

Retort Records – Various Artists

Which booze? Shots of Sambucca

These artists have produced music that is hard-hitting, sharp and to an acquired taste – just like a swig of Sambucca. The electronic and percussive fusion makes for an interesting listen and it is like nothing you’ll have heard before. Each with their own sound and direction, we recommend listening to each one separately to get a true taste of the music and fully understand what Retort are trying to achieve.

Amanda Bloom – The History Of Things To Come

ImageWhich Booze? Pinot Noir 

Amanda Bloom is an elegant Australian singer and composer who began studying piano at the age of three, wrote her first sonata aged six and debuted at the Sydney Opera House at just 17.  Her new album, The History Of Things To Come has been described as an epic and astounding fusion of fantasy, circus, classical, and piano-driven alternative rock. The album draws its inspiration from her experiences living in Cambodia for the last two years and is a melting pot of world, classical and piano-driven melodic pop music.

Check out her full album on Youtube:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D9Ei7PZqUjc

And see her perform her track ‘Fallacy’ here:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YbaIkr7n_Q4&feature=youtu.be